See more objects with the color lightsteelblue darkslategrey dimgrey lightslategrey darkslategrey or see all the colors for this object.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2011

  • Work on this object began.

2015

2018

  • Work on this object ended.

2019

  • You found it!

Moganshan, 2011–2018 (anticipated completion date)

This is a Moganshan. It was designed by Heatherwick Studio and Thomas Heatherwick and made for (as the client) Tian An China Investments Company Ltd.. It is dated 2011–2018 (anticipated completion date).

How can a big new development relate to its surroundings?
For the studio’s design of a major new mixed-use project on a site next to the city’s M50 art district and an existing park, it was important that it responded to the area’s human scale. Their instinct was to break a huge building into smaller pieces supported by approximately 1,000 columns that they imagined as trees. The columns, built at different heights, appear to grow up through the building with a large planter for one or more trees atop each column, creating a vast tree-house city. The project is under construction and is due to be completed in 2018.

It is credited Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio.

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio.

This object may be subject to Copyright or other restrictions.

You are welcome to make fair use of this image under U.S. Copyright law and in compliance with our terms of use. Please note that you are responsible for determining whether your use is fair and for responding to any claims that may arise from your use.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/85006469/ |title=Moganshan, 2011–2018 (anticipated completion date) |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=24 March 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>