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Object Timeline

1984

  • Work on this object began.

1994

  • We acquired this object.

  • Work on this object ended.

2015

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2020

  • You found it!

Clock, Askew, ca. 1989

This is a clock. It was designed by M&Co. It is dated ca. 1989 and we acquired it in 1994. Its medium is anodized aluminum, plastic, quartz movement. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

The firm M & Co., founded by Timor Kalman, was known for its innovative use of images and type to create imaginative and witty designs. Although the numbers of the Askew Clock are jumbled, the clock still tells accurate time if the viewer reads the hands instead of the numbers. An oversized version of this clock appears on top of Red Square, an apartment building that M & Co. designed on Houston Street and Avenue A in New York City.


This object was donated by Tibor Kalman. It is credited Gift of Tibor Kalman/ M & Co..

  • Big Ben Clock, 1931
  • cast metal, glass, blued steel (hands), printed paper.
  • Museum purchase through gift of Neil Sellin.
  • 1999-2-1

Our curators have highlighted 2 objects that are related to this one.

Its dimensions are

3.2 × 23.5 cm (1 1/4 × 9 1/4 in.)

Cite this object as

Clock, Askew, ca. 1989; Designed by M&Co (United States); USA; anodized aluminum, plastic, quartz movement; 3.2 × 23.5 cm (1 1/4 × 9 1/4 in.); Gift of Tibor Kalman/ M & Co.; 1993-151-29-1/4

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Bob Greenberg Selects.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18644325/ |title=Clock, Askew, ca. 1989 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=27 September 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>