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Object Timeline

1980

  • We acquired this object.

2007

2008

2019

Sidewall, Tulip, 1893–1895

This is a Sidewall. It was designed by Charles Francis Annesley Voysey. It is dated 1893–1895 and we acquired it in 1980. Its medium is block-printed paper. It is a part of the Wallcoverings department.

Charles Francis Annesley Voysey’s wallpaper and textile designs were known references for painters working at the Rozenburg Pottery and Porcelain Factory in the Netherlands, whose designs can be seen in the case nearby. Voysey adapted nature into flat designs that appealed to biological and botanical interests of the era. Here, tulips and acanthus leaves are interlaced in a dynamic composition

This object was donated by Dr. Francis J. Geck. It is credited Gift of Dr. Francis J. Geck.

Our curators have highlighted 2 objects that are related to this one.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 91.5 x 56cm (36 x 22 1/16in.)

Cite this object as

Sidewall, Tulip, 1893–1895; Designed by Charles Francis Annesley Voysey (English, 1857 - 1941); England; block-printed paper; H x W: 91.5 x 56cm (36 x 22 1/16in.); Gift of Dr. Francis J. Geck; 1980-73-32

In addition to Botanical Expressions, this object was previously on display as part of the exhibition Rococo: The Continuing Curve 1730-2008.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18667891/ |title=Sidewall, Tulip, 1893–1895 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=16 December 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>