Object Timeline

1952

  • Work on this object began.

2016

  • We acquired this object.

2017

2020

  • You found it!

Textile, Treasure Trove, 1952

This is a Textile. It was designed by William Ward Beecher and produced by Associated American Artists. It is dated 1952 and we acquired it in 2016. Its medium is cotton and its technique is printed. It is a part of the Textiles Department department.

William Ward Beecher, whose art career began when he won a U.S. Air Force art contest, became known as an expert in the trompe l’oeil style.

Betty Pepin wrote of his skilled hand in The New York Times on February 27, 1953: “’Treasure Trove’ by William Ward Beecher is a meticulous three-dimensional trompe l’oeil picture of ivy, books, a sextant, a metronome and a candlestick placed on shelves.”

In this colorway, the brown, pink, and aqua treasures, arranged on pale green shelves, cast shadows on the olive green walls behind them.

Pepin noted that this design recalled the Americana theme of Pioneer Pathways, the original collection of Riverdale Fabrics. Treasure Trove was also released as a line of Stonelain ceramics.

This is one of five distinct designs by Beecher presented for consideration.

This object was donated by American Textile History Museum. It is credited American Textile History Museum Collection, gift of Ann Cadrette.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 287 × 139.7 cm (113 × 55 in.)

Cite this object as

Textile, Treasure Trove, 1952; Designed by William Ward Beecher (American, 1921 - 2006); cotton; H x W: 287 × 139.7 cm (113 × 55 in.); American Textile History Museum Collection, gift of Ann Cadrette; 2016-35-50

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108711633/ |title=Textile, Treasure Trove, 1952 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=29 March 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>