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Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

-0001

1939

  • Work on this object began.

2021

  • You found it!

Trade Catalog, The Armstrong Pattern Book, Linoleum Pattern No. 8780

This is a Trade catalog. It was written by Armstrong Cork Company and published by Armstrong Cork Company. It is dated 1939. Its medium is offset lithography on paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

The Armstrong Cork Company began manufacturing linoleum in 1908, producing an amazing variety of patterns—by 1918, they advertised 380 designs. Linoleum was durable, versatile, easy to clean, and could imitate nearly any other material. The designs included mosaics, tiles, parquetries, granites, marble, and carpeting. This catalog documents the styles and interior design trends of the 1930s and 40s, with modern looking geometric patterns in addition to more traditional patterns with “homey” motifs and floral designs. It shows flooring for every room in a home, and spaces where linoleum was the preferred flooring material. This particular pattern, no. 8780, uses a faux marble tile background with solid color rectangles and is suggested for use in kitchens, beauty parlors, tourist cabins, and sun porches. In the early 21st century, linoleum is making a comeback as an eco-friendly material.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 26 × 21 cm (10 1/4 × 8 1/4 in.)

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68776023/ |title=Trade Catalog, The Armstrong Pattern Book, Linoleum Pattern No. 8780 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=25 October 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>