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Book Illustration, La cavalerie françoise et italienne, ou, L'art de bien dresser les chevaux, selon les preceptes des bonnes écoles des deux nations . . . , Spiral dressage pattern, plate 49, 1620

This is a Book Illustration. It was written by Pierre de La Noue and engraved by Chez Iac. de Heÿden and printed by Claude Morillon. It is dated 1620. Its medium is etching on paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

Controlling your horse to maneuver a tightening spiral pattern is an exercise in expert horsemanship. From ancient times, dressage training prepared horses for battle by improving their obedience, stamina, and agility. Using techniques and drills from French and Italian cavalry schools, this book teaches the principles of dressage for both military and sporting pleasure. It is illustrated with diagrams and walking patterns, such as this one. The work is notable for the sections that relate to the training of horses for military purposes and, particularly, on training the animals not to fear artillery and familiarizing them with the noise and smoke of gunfire.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 50 × 35 cm (19 11/16 × 13 3/4 in.)

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68774901/ |title=Book Illustration, La cavalerie françoise et italienne, ou, L'art de bien dresser les chevaux, selon les preceptes des bonnes écoles des deux nations . . . , Spiral dressage pattern, plate 49, 1620 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=30 March 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>