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2021

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Book Illustration, Designs of Chinese Buildings, Furniture, Dresses, Machines, and Utensils; Pagoda design, 1757

This is a Book Illustration. It was written by William Chambers and published by William Chambers. It is dated 1757. Its medium is engraving on paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

Sir William Chambers, a Swedish-born architect of Scottish descent, worked in England beginning in 1755. Though he worked in many architectural styles, Chambers promoted Chinese motifs and buildings inspired by Chinese design when he traveled to China as an employee of the Swedish East India Company in the 1740s. Chambers’ 1757 publication, which includes more than 20 pages of drawings of buildings, furniture, dresses, and utensils, was the key pattern book of its time for illustrating Chinese patterns and designs. This engraving illustrates Chambers’ designs for a multi-tiered pagoda—an architectural form found throughout East Asia, traditionally used as a place of worship and for housing relics and sacred texts. It is the pagoda’s sculptural form and secular use as ornament in gardens that appealed to Chambers and other landscape designers.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 76.5 × 56 cm (30 1/8 × 22 1/16 in.)

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68766157/ |title=Book Illustration, Designs of Chinese Buildings, Furniture, Dresses, Machines, and Utensils; Pagoda design, 1757 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=28 July 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>