See more objects with the tag digital, utility, tool, geometric, portable, smooth, space, 3D printing.

See more objects with the color grey darkslategrey dimgrey or see all the colors for this object.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

-0001

2013

  • Work on this object began.

2014

2019

  • You found it!

Related Tools And Parts, 2013–14

This is a Related Tools and Parts. It was made by Made In Space, Inc. and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

This object is not part of the Cooper Hewitt's permanent collection. It was able to spend time at the museum on loan from Made In Space, Inc. as part of Tools: Extending Our Reach.

It is dated 2013–14. Its medium is thermoplastic.

Made in Space and NASA partnered to launch the "3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment"—or, "the flying factory"—on September 23, 2014. Three-D printers use an additive extrusion-based process to build objects layer by layer out of polymers, composites, and other materials. Thus far, all space missions have been completely dependent on Earth for equipment, but as missions get longer and further from Earth, the more difficult it is to resupply materials. The current supply chain from Earth to space can be largely bypassed with 3D printers, with astronauts able to create the parts they need, including common instruments and replacement parts. Made in Space’s 3D printer has generated a selection of ABS-plastic test parts such as these examples. Once the printer is operable on the International Space Station, the printed parts will be the the very first objects to be manufactured off planet Earth.

It is credited Courtesy of Made In Space, Inc. and NASA.

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

Its dimensions are

H x W x D (1): 0.4 × 3 × 3 cm (3/16 × 1 3/16 × 1 3/16 in.) H x W x D (2): 5.5 × 1 × 1 cm (2 3/16 × 3/8 × 3/8 in.) H x W x D (3): 0.4 × 1.9 × 11.4 cm (3/16 × 3/4 × 4 1/2 in.) H x W x D (4): 2.5 × 12.7 × 12.7 cm (1 × 5 × 5 in.) H x W x D (5): 0.4 × 1 × 8.8 cm (3/16 × 3/8 × 3 7/16 in.) H x W x D (6): 0.4 × 2 × 7.5 cm (3/16 × 13/16 × 2 15/16 in.) H x W x D (7): 3 × 3 × 2.5 cm (1 3/16 in. × 1 3/16 in. × 1 in.) H x W x D (8): 1.3 × 3.9 × 4.8 cm (1/2 × 1 9/16 × 1 7/8 in.) H x W x D (9): 0.8 × 2.1 × 2.1 cm (5/16 × 13/16 × 13/16 in.) H x W x D (10): 0.5 × 2 × 6.1 cm (3/16 × 13/16 × 2 3/8 in.) H x W x D (11): 0.5 × 2.2 × 2.5 cm (3/16 × 7/8 × 15/16 in.) H x W x D (12): 3.4 × 4.5 × 4.5 cm (1 5/16 × 1 3/4 × 1 3/4 in.) H x W x D (13): 0.3 × 3.3 × 4.9 cm (1/8 × 1 5/16 × 1 15/16 in.) H x W x D (James Banks health coaster): 3.3 × 6.6 × 2.9 cm (1 5/16 × 2 5/8 × 1 1/8 in.) H x W (Made In Space Plaque): 6.8 × 6.8 cm (2 11/16 × 2 11/16 in.)

We have 1 video that features Related Tools And Parts, 2013–14.

Made in Space

A demonstration of the first 3D Printer to be used in space.

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Tools: Extending Our Reach.

This object may be subject to Copyright or other restrictions.

You are welcome to make fair use of this image under U.S. Copyright law and in compliance with our terms of use. Please note that you are responsible for determining whether your use is fair and for responding to any claims that may arise from your use.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68268743/ |title=Related Tools And Parts, 2013–14 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=19 October 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>