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Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2013

  • Work on this object began.

2014

2020

  • You found it!

Facial Armor, Ballistic Face Mask, 2013

This is a Facial Armor. It was manufactured by International Armor Corporation. It is dated 2013. Its medium is kevlar®.

Modern industrial masks like this bullet-resistant headgear are portraits of our tech¬nological society. They speak directly and powerfully of the dangers of the age. As a shield that hides more than the face, this artifact extends the body’s capability to engage with life-threatening situations and has one overriding purpose: to keep the wearer alive. Made of Kevlar®, it is part of the armor worn by law-enforcement officers during raids or when apprehending snipers. Its design is a visual expression of its purpose: with the individual totally effaced, its sinister appearance ups the ante of confrontation and intimidation. Con¬cealing all but the eyes, it gives the wearer an immediate advantage, serving to unnerve and frighten the suspect into compliance.

It is credited Museum purchase.

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Its dimensions are

H x W x D: 28.3 x 21.7 x 9.2 cm (11 1/8 x 8 9/16 x 3 5/8 in.)

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Tools: Extending Our Reach.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/51497643/ |title=Facial Armor, Ballistic Face Mask, 2013 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=29 May 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>