See more objects with the tag DIY, tools, health.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2009

  • Work on this object began.

2013

  • Work on this object ended.

2016

2019

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MEDIKits, 2009–2013

This is a Project. It was designed by José Gómez-Márquez, Mrs. A. Murray Young, Ryan Scott Bardsley and Amy Smith, MIT's D-lab. It is dated 2009–2013. Its medium is drug delivery kit: nebulizer, surgical tubing, bike pump, syringes, needles, small surgical tubing; diagnostics kit: lateral flow strip “puzzle pieces” embedded with reagents, chromatography paper, chemical reagents; microfluidics kit: glass slides, doubl.

Most of the medical equipment in developing countries—imported from the developed world—is quickly rendered useless due to a lack of replacement parts or training. MEDIKits are medical toolkits that enable healthcare workers in resource-poor communities to develop, through modification or building, their own innovative medical devices from locally available, inexpensive parts. A handheld microscope attached to a mobile phone enables healthcare workers to take and transmit pictures of pathogens via MMS messages. An alarm for IV bags made from a spring and circuit signals before the bag empties—useful in understaffed health centers. The MEDIKit is leading user-driven, disruptive innovation in some of the world’s poorest locations.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/420778957/ |title=MEDIKits, 2009–2013 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=20 September 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>