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Object Timeline

2010

  • Work on this object began.

2014

2018

  • We acquired this object.

2021

  • You found it!

Poster, Circumpolar I, 2010

This is a Poster. It was designed by Rebeca Méndez. It is dated 2010 and we acquired it in 2018. Its medium is archival inkjet print on paper. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

The poster series, Circumpolar (2010), is a good example of the kind of project that interests Méndez, straddling both the art and graphic design fields. This poster uses film and digital footage that Méndez produced for an installation project documenting the migration to and from the Arctic and Antarctic of a small seabird, the Arctic Tern. The film follows the bird’s 45,000 mile trip across the planet’s meridians using the sun, the earth’s magnetic field, ocean currents and trade winds as guides. This Circumpolar poster was made for the International Biennial of the Poster in 2010 in Mexico. The design captures the idea of circumlocution by showing eight images, in different frames, of a man moving across a landscape and getting larger from the top to bottom stills.

This object was donated by Rebeca Méndez. It is credited Gift of Rebeca Méndez.

Its dimensions are

111.6 x 79.5 cm (43 15/16 x 31 5/16 in.)

Cite this object as

Poster, Circumpolar I, 2010; Designed by Rebeca Méndez (Mexican and American, b. 1962); USA; archival inkjet print on paper; 111.6 x 79.5 cm (43 15/16 x 31 5/16 in.); Gift of Rebeca Méndez; 2018-12-1

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/35460861/ |title=Poster, Circumpolar I, 2010 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=20 January 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>