See more objects with the tag lighting, cylinder, tool, flared, portable, movable, orange plastic, conical.

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Object Timeline

1970

  • Work on this object began.

1990

  • Work on this object ended.

1994

  • We acquired this object.

2006

2007

2015

2021

  • You found it!

Flashlight (England), ca. 1980

This is a flashlight. It is dated ca. 1980 and we acquired it in 1994. Its medium is molded plastic, aluminum. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

By the 1980s, flashlights not only had to be durable, they also needed multiple features in order to stand out in the growing variety of handheld lighting devices. Berec – the British Ever Ready Export Company, the South African subsidiary of Every Ready – developed this durable mixed-material flashlight to meet these demands. The conical orange and black plastic lamp housing partially turns and rises to create a second lighting setting: a focusing beam.

This object was donated by Max Pine. It is credited Gift of Max and Barbara Pine.

Its dimensions are

H x diam.: 12 x 5 cm (4 3/4 x 1 15/16 in.)

It has the following markings

Stamped on metal shaft, under switch: "BEREC"

Cite this object as

Flashlight (England), ca. 1980; molded plastic, aluminum; H x diam.: 12 x 5 cm (4 3/4 x 1 15/16 in.); Gift of Max and Barbara Pine; 1994-59-7

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition IDEO Selects: Works from the Permanent Collection.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18648923/ |title=Flashlight (England), ca. 1980 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=19 September 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>