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Object Timeline

-0001

1936

  • Work on this object began.

1971

  • We acquired this object.

2015

2017

2020

  • You found it!

Cocktail Shaker With Lid (USA), 1936

This is a Cocktail shaker with lid. It was designed by Emil Arthur Schuelke and manufactured by Napier. It is dated 1936 and we acquired it in 1971. Its medium is cast silver-plated metal. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

This object was donated by Rodman A. Heeren. It is credited Gift of Rodman A. Heeren.

Our curators have highlighted 5 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

  • Flask, 1925–30
  • sterling silver, cork.
  • Lent by Brooklyn Museum, Modernism Benefit Fund, 1990.10a-b.
  • 33.2016.3
  • Cocktail Set, ca. 1928
  • silver-plated brass and “vitrolite” glass.
  • Lent by Milwaukee Art Museum, Purchase, with funds from Demmer Charitable....
  • 45.2016.1a/h
  • Cocktail Shaker, 1931
  • silver.
  • Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago, Restricted gift of Quinn E. Delaney;....
  • 34.2016.1

Its dimensions are

H x W x D: 30.9 x 12.8 x 17.5cm (12 3/16 x 5 1/16 x 6 7/8in.)

Cite this object as

Cocktail Shaker With Lid (USA), 1936; Designed by Emil Arthur Schuelke (American, 1901 – 1986); cast silver-plated metal; H x W x D: 30.9 x 12.8 x 17.5cm (12 3/16 x 5 1/16 x 6 7/8in.); Gift of Rodman A. Heeren; 1971-92-1-a,b

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Virtue in Vice.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18475693/ |title=Cocktail Shaker With Lid (USA), 1936 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=28 September 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>