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Object Timeline

1925

  • Work on this object ended.

1964

  • We acquired this object.

2014

2018

2020

  • You found it!

Brisé Fan, late 19th–early 20th century

This is a Brisé fan. It is dated late 19th–early 20th century and we acquired it in 1964. Its medium is carved and pierced ivory sticks, peacock and peahen feathers, gilt metal bail, silk tassel. It is a part of the Textiles Department department.

The dazzling iridescent colors of a peacock’s tail feathers are created without the use of any real pigmentation at all. The colors are caused by light interference, an optical phenomenon produced by micro-structures of the feather which cause the light to refract or bend. Such colors are called “structural colors.”

This object was donated by James Breed and Mrs. James M. Breed. It is credited Gift of Mrs. James M. Breed.

  • Vase (USA), 1920–1929
  • blown, iridized, and tooled glass.
  • Museum purchase from Mary Blackwelder Memorial Fund.
  • 1977-56-1

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Its dimensions are

H x W (open, with tassel): 53.3 × 54.6 cm (21 × 21 1/2 in.)

Cite this object as

Brisé Fan, late 19th–early 20th century; carved and pierced ivory sticks, peacock and peahen feathers, gilt metal bail, silk tassel; H x W (open, with tassel): 53.3 × 54.6 cm (21 × 21 1/2 in.); Gift of Mrs. James M. Breed; 1964-18-1

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18451303/ |title=Brisé Fan, late 19th–early 20th century |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=28 May 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>