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Object Timeline

1920

  • We acquired this object.

2016

2018

2019

2020

  • You found it!

Bound Print, Plate 2 (Suite 1), La Brouette (The Bath Chair), Essai de papilloneries humaines (Ideas for Scenes with Butterflies Masquerading as Humans)

This is a Bound print. It was designed by Charles-Germain de Saint-Aubin and published by Étienne Fessard and etched by Étienne Fessard. We acquired it in 1920. Its medium is etching on laid paper. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.



Anthropomorphized butterflies direct a bath chair with a single insect occupant. The term "bath chair" derives from its initial function—transporting invalids to the natural mineral and thermal spring bathhouses. Adopted by the upper classes, Aubin might be mocking its use by those who considered themselves too delicate to walk.

This object was donated by Advisory Council.

Cite this object as

Bound Print, Plate 2 (Suite 1), La Brouette (The Bath Chair), Essai de papilloneries humaines (Ideas for Scenes with Butterflies Masquerading as Humans); Designed by Charles-Germain de Saint-Aubin (French, 1721–1786); etching on laid paper; 1921-6-402-3

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Embroidered and Embellished.

This image is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian’s Terms of Use page.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18269787/ |title=Bound Print, Plate 2 (Suite 1), La Brouette (The Bath Chair), Essai de papilloneries humaines (Ideas for Scenes with Butterflies Masquerading as Humans) |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=20 February 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>