See more objects with the tag New York City, sculpture, urban, skyscraper.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

1920

  • Work on this object began.

1930

  • Work on this object ended.

2017

2021

  • You found it!

Sculpture, New York

This is a sculpture. It was designed by John B. Storrs. It is dated ca. 1925. Its medium is brass and steel on black marble base (or vulcanite base).

American sculptor John Bradley Storrs conceived a series of works in the mid to late 1920s based on ideas derived from architecture. In this work, New York, of about 1925, Storrs uses brass and steel to link the aesthetic of the city to his grouped and stacked form, mimicking that last moment in the urban day when sunlight touches the tallest structures.

It is credited Lent by Indianapolis Museum of Art, Discretionary Fund, 73.8.

  • Floor Lamp (USA)
  • chrome-plated metal.
  • Gift of Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.
  • 2009-17-1
  • Door With Handle (France)
  • carved, joined, and lacquered wood, eggshell, mother-of-pearl, gold leaf,....
  • Gift of Mrs. Solomon R. Guggenheim.
  • 1950-104-1

Our curators have highlighted 2 objects that are related to this one.

  • Vase, ca. 1929
  • ceramic.
  • Collection of Mark Bassett and George Cooper.
  • 47.2016.3
  • Chair, 1928
  • aluminum, brass, leather.
  • Private Collection.
  • 79.2016.1

Its dimensions are

Without base H x W x D: 53.3 × 9.8 × 3.2 cm (21 in. × 3 7/8 in. × 1 1/4 in.) With base H x W x D: 63.5 × 14 × 8.9 cm (25 in. × 5 1/2 in. × 3 1/2 in.)

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s.

There are restrictions for re-using this image. For more information, visit the Smithsonian’s Terms of Use page.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/907216069/ |title=Sculpture, New York |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=27 November 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>