See more objects with the tag nature, twisted, curved, layers, outdoors, tension, shelter, stacked, student, garden.

See more objects with the color darkslategrey dimgrey rosybrown silver darkolivegreen or see all the colors for this object.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

1992

  • Work on this object began.

1994

  • Work on this object ended.

2015

2019

  • You found it!

Gazebo, 1992–1994

This is a Gazebo. It was designed by Heatherwick Studio and Thomas Heatherwick. It is dated 1992–1994. Its medium is stacked birch plywood.

Can you make a building using only two components?

This project, made for his Royal College of Art graduation show, continues Heatherwick’s early interest in making a full-size building. Tilting stacks of wood pieces toward each other, like shuffling playing cards, enabled them to support each other structurally. As the stacks meet, they mesh together, passing through each other and continuing upward. The building is made from just two components: a curved element and a disc, 600 of each, layered together. It was an experiment in setting a rule and
letting that make the design. The actual gazebo resides at Sir Terence Conran’s home in Berkshire, England.

It is credited Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio.

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio.

This object may be subject to Copyright or other restrictions.

You are welcome to make fair use of this image under U.S. Copyright law and in compliance with our terms of use. Please note that you are responsible for determining whether your use is fair and for responding to any claims that may arise from your use.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/85006407/ |title=Gazebo, 1992–1994 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=16 September 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>