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Object Timeline

1924

  • Work on this object began.

2014

  • We acquired this object.

2015

2021

  • You found it!

Print, Muzykal'naia nov' (Musical New Land) , No. 10, 1924

This is a Print. It was graphic design by Liubov Popova and collected by Merrill Berman. It is dated 1924 and we acquired it in 2014. Its medium is letterpress on paper. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

While trained as a painter, Liubov Popova abandoned her painting career in 1921 for art that served the people and the communist State. Strongly influenced by Kasimir Malevich and Alexandr Rodchenko, she applied a Constructivist aesthetic to her posters and other printed ephemera, textiles, stage design, clothing and ceramics. Presented here is an issue of the Russian avant-garde journal, Muzykal’naia nov’ (Musical New Land), no. 4, 1924, with a cover by Popova. This is a powerful graphic whose boldness and central focus approaches graphic designs of Rodchenko. The Musical New Land journal is relatively rare, since only 1500 copies were printed.

This object was donated by Merrill Berman. It is credited Gift of Merrill C. Berman.

Its dimensions are

30.5 × 22.7 cm (12 in. × 8 15/16 in.)

Cite this object as

Print, Muzykal'naia nov' (Musical New Land) , No. 10, 1924; Graphic design by Liubov Popova (Russian, 1889–1924); letterpress on paper; 30.5 × 22.7 cm (12 in. × 8 15/16 in.); Gift of Merrill C. Berman; 2014-45-1

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68793051/ |title=Print, Muzykal'naia nov' (Musical New Land) , No. 10, 1924 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=5 August 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>