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Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

-0001

2019

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Paper Construction, Garden Scene with Dancers, to be Used as the Set for a Miniature Theater, ca. 1740

This is a Paper construction. It was created by Martin Engelbrecht and printed by Martin Engelbrecht. It is dated ca. 1740. Its medium is hand-colored etching, cut paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

This colorful and intricately cut paper work, called a peep-show or tunnel book, consists of a set of six hand-colored etched prints on light gray laid paper, with sections carefully cut out to create a perspective view when the prints are arranged in a viewing box. Depicted are aristocratic men and women holding flowers or gardening implements dancing together in a scene set in a formal garden reminiscent of Versailles. Engraver and print-seller Martin Engelbrecht, of Augsburg, Germany, created a series of similar tunnel books with diverse imagery as a novelty to entertain and amuse the elite classes of the 18th century.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 17 × 20 cm (6 11/16 × 7 7/8 in.), each plate

This object has no known Copyright restrictions.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68776027/ |title=Paper Construction, Garden Scene with Dancers, to be Used as the Set for a Miniature Theater, ca. 1740 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=14 December 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>