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  • We acquired this object.

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2020

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Book Illustration, Album de meubles boulle, no. 10: contenant modèles style Louis XV–Louis XIV et Louis XVI; Bureau de dame, bronzes et marqueterie de bois, plate 1174, 1860s

This is a Book Illustration. It was designed by Mr. Koestler and published by Victor L. Quétin and printed by Victor L. Quétin. It is dated 1860s. Its medium is engraving on paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

The forms and patterns of marquetry as perfected by André-Charles Boulle are on clear display in this engraving from almost a century after he first popularized them. The forms of the carcase were classic and had changed remarkably little—despite brief flirtations with rococo carved pieces—as the workshops producing boulle marquetry catered to a large, diverse market. These forms and the technique endured amid changing Parisian fashions, providing a foundation for great variation in pattern. The beautiful decorative patterns could be made from a wide variety of materials, like tortoiseshell, brass, pewter, and other fine materials.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 29 × 19 cm (11 7/16 × 7 1/2 in.)

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68775081/ |title=Book Illustration, Album de meubles boulle, no. 10: contenant modèles style Louis XV–Louis XIV et Louis XVI; Bureau de dame, bronzes et marqueterie de bois, plate 1174, 1860s |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=27 September 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>