See more objects with the tag transportation, mobility, data, collaboration.

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2018

2020

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Los Angeles Mobility Data Specification, 2018

This is a Los Angeles Mobility Data Specification. It was designed by The City of Los Angeles, led by the LA Department of Transportation (LADOT) and Information Technology Agency (ITA). It is dated 2018.

To manage the disruption caused by expanding mobility options—from dock-less scooters to autonomous fleets—Los Angeles developed a new data standard and language. Through an open source public-private collaboration, LA worked with other cities and mobility companies to create the specification. It requires companies to share real-time data, critical information that enables cities to design safer, more responsive streets and actively manage transportation.

Remix Planning Platform
2018
Remix (San Francisco, California, USA, founded 2014)

An innovative planning platform used in over 300 cities, including Los Angeles, the platform enables planners to make informed decisions with a city’s mobility data by understanding how streets, public transit, and new mobility work together.

Video: Managing Transportation in the Digital Age
2018
2:03 minutes
Produced by and courtesy of Remix

It is credited Courtesy of Remix.

  • CityScope, 2018
  • aluminum, electronics, mirrors, acrylic, wood, plastic.
  • Courtesy of MIT Media Lab.
  • MOBILITY.037

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Road Ahead: Reimagining Mobility.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318795929/ |title=Los Angeles Mobility Data Specification, 2018 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=15 August 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>