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2005

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Sample Plate (France), 1887

This is a Sample plate. It was manufactured by A. Lacroix & Cie. It is dated 1887 and we acquired it in 2005. Its medium is glazed porcelain. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

Sample plates give us an idea of the colors and techniques that were fashionable during different periods. This sample plate shows the variation of individual colors when white floral decoration mixes with a solid color, giving us an idea of the aesthetic concerns of the age. It also adds to our understanding of the manufacturer’s range of vitrifiable colors available for porcelain and their properties.

It is credited Museum purchase from General Acquisitions Endowment.

Our curators have highlighted 15 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

Its dimensions are

H x diam.: 2.8 x 23 cm (1 1/8 x 9 1/16 in.)

It has the following markings

On base: "Limoges" France

Cite this object as

Sample Plate (France), 1887; Manufactured by A. Lacroix & Cie (France); glazed porcelain; H x diam.: 2.8 x 23 cm (1 1/8 x 9 1/16 in.); Museum purchase from General Acquisitions Endowment; 2005-11-1

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18702033/ |title=Sample Plate (France), 1887 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=18 February 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>