Object Timeline

1965

  • Work on this object began.

1966

  • Work on this object ended.

1997

  • We acquired this object.

2016

2021

  • You found it!

Poster, Perspecta Thirteen-Perspecta Fourteen, Yale Architectural Journal, 1965–66

This is a Poster. It was designed by E&C Pullman. It is dated 1965–66 and we acquired it in 1997. Its medium is offset lithograph on white wove paper. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

This object was donated by Ken Friedman. It is credited Gift of Ken Friedman.

Its dimensions are

127.8 x 90.2 cm (50 5/16 x 35 1/2 in. )

It is inscribed

Upper center in black letters: Perspecta Thirteen-Perspecta Fourteen / The Yale Architectural Journal / Now available: Box 2121 Yale Station, New Haven / Connecticut 06520 USA. Lower right: Yale University Printing Service. The Lectures/Presentations are as follows: at 11: "Norman Bel Geddes: Highways and Horizons" / Robert Coombs at 28: "Multi Media / Machine Building" / Judy Wolin at 36: "From Object to Relationship II: Giuseppe Terragni Casa Giuliani Frigerio Casa del Fascio" / Peter D. Eisenman at 66: "Eileen Gray: two Houses and an Interior 1926-1933" / Joseph Rykwert at 74: "Paul Nelson: an interview" / Judith Applegate at 130: "Bijvoet and Duiker" / Robert Vickery at 162: "The M.A.R.S. Plan for London" / Arthur Korn, Maxwell Fry, and Dennis Sharp at 174: "Have Mercy I Cry City" / Mike Heron at 176: "Park Meerwijk: an Expressionist Experiment in Holland" / Dennis Sharp at 191: "Hoover Limited" / Neil Aptaker at 194: "The Burlington Zephyr" at 197: "Picture a Penthouse Way Up In The Sky" / Thomas Doremus at 202: "A Germ-Free Condition" / Edward Ruscha Perspecta 14 at 209: "Live in Utopia? Habiter L Utopia?" / Jacques Erhmann at 219: "City Structuring and Social Sense in 19th and 20th Century Urbanism" / Peter Wolf at 234: "Q.E.II" / Ellen Leopold at 242: "The New Industrial Wworld: the reconstruction of urban utopia in late nineteenth century France" / Anthony Vidler at 243: The following quotation: " A marsh land flanks the moun / tainside...The drawing of / this noxious marsh will be the / culmination of our labors.../ I will offer these vast plains to the millions, that they / might live there freely, if / not securely. A paradise on / earth! I pledge my faith in / this thought, which is the / ultimate end of wisdom.../ would I was able to enjoy such / a spectacle, to live with a free people on a free earth." / Goethe, Faust, Part II at 258: "Some Houses of Ill-Repute" / Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown at 268: "The End of Utopia" / Manfredi G. Nicoletti at 280: "Utopia and/or Revolution/Utopia e o Revoluzione / Paolo Soleri at 286: "Transparency: Literal and Phenomenal...Part 2" / Colin Rowe and Robert Slutzky at 302: "Superstudio" / Superstudio at 316: "Bertrand Goldberg" / Heinrich Klutz at 328: "Valley Curtain Project for Colorado" / Christo at 330: " A Young Architect's Protest for Architecture" / Bruce Goff at 358: "I The University of Design and Development II Manhatten: Capital of / the Twentieth Century III The Designs of Freedom" / Emilio Ambasz [this followed by I II III] at 367: "The Annual Great House" / Melvin and Diane Johnson at 372: EDITOR: Robert Coombs DESIGNER: Erik Muller MANAGING EDITIOR: Everado Jefferson [these names pertain to the publication of the actual journal, not the poster itself]

Cite this object as

Poster, Perspecta Thirteen-Perspecta Fourteen, Yale Architectural Journal, 1965–66; Designed by E&C Pullman (United States); offset lithograph on white wove paper; 127.8 x 90.2 cm (50 5/16 x 35 1/2 in. ); Gift of Ken Friedman; 1997-19-207

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18673431/ |title=Poster, Perspecta Thirteen-Perspecta Fourteen, Yale Architectural Journal, 1965–66 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=11 May 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>