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Object Timeline

1920

  • Work on this object began.

1929

  • Work on this object ended.

2016

  • We acquired this object.

2017

2019

  • You found it!

Textile

This is a Textile. It was manufactured by Cheney Brothers. We acquired it in 2016. Its medium is silk and its technique is jacquard woven. It is a part of the Textiles department.

When Cheney Brothers opened its Paris studio in 1918, Henri Créange was engaged to take over the firm’s creative direction. He soon introduced a collection of fabrics inspired by the designs of artist Raoul Dufy and Paris couturier Paul Poiret, of which this appears to be an example. Poiret had opened an experimental art school, École Martine, for untrained, working class girls. Atelier Martine adapted the best of the students’ drawings to create fresh, “naïve” designs for textiles and wallpapers. This pattern of clusters of simple daisies evokes the style, although it is woven in silk rather than printed on simple cotton or linen. The gold and brown color scheme is reminiscent of the single-color wood block prints Dufy created for Poiret’s fashions, and later for Bianchini Ferier.

This object was donated by American Textile History Museum.

Cite this object as

Textile; Manufactured by Cheney Brothers (United States); silk; 2016-35-104

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108711757/ |title=Textile |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=24 August 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>