Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/2318797399/

Katagami

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18603217/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon juice (kakishibu), silk threads (itoire)
  • Museum purchase through gift of Norvin Hewitt Green
  • water
  • waves
  • black and white
  • fishing
  • ocean

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18607263/

  • cotton
  • Museum purchase through gift of Jacques Seligmann
  • water
  • waves
  • adornment
  • apparel fabric
  • cooling
  • sea

This cotton fabric bears a repeated wave motif rendered in rich indigo blue on a white ground. Indigo dye is especially well suited for use with absorbent cotton, explaining a traditional color palette of whites and blues for the light summer kimono called yukata. This length of fabric, intended for constructing a yukata, still bears its original tag. A series of stamped crests identify the artists, the grade of cloth, and price. It was sold by Mitsukoshi, a department store that began as a 17th-century kimono shop, and still exists today.

This object is currently on display in room 201 in Carnegie Mansion.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18556105/

  • silk samples, paper book
  • Gift of Rowland Burdon-Muller

Traditional Japanese robes are fashioned from standard-sized widths of fabric, and sewn—rather than cut—to fit. As a result, variations in style are expressed through a garment’s material and decoration, rather than through its tailoring. This sample book from Kyoto was created to assist customers shopping for new resist-dyed fabric. Working in close consultation with a fabric dealer, the client could use the samples as a guide when selecting a preferred color and patterning.

This object is currently on display in room 201 in Carnegie Mansion.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489719/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder
  • Japanese
  • starburst
  • stencil

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18410687/

  • cotton

During the Edo (1603–1868) and Meiji (1868–1912) periods, most Japanese people wore fabrics dyed with indigo—a plant-based dye that produces shades of blue. But while these relatively sober tones were generally favored for adults, brightly colored textiles were considered appropriate for children. This tiny kimono, possibly for an infant, features a vibrant blue-and-gold decoration intended to invoke more expensive techniques like embroidery. Its repeating pattern is distinctively uneven, suggesting that it may be the result of a combination of different dying processes involving stencils and resist.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489823/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18410689/

  • cotton
  • pattern
  • abstraction
  • repetition
  • textile design
  • triangles
  • geometric
  • simplify

IRIS PATTERN (group label) In Japan, the technique of using stencils for textile dyeing developed out of methods originally devised for decorating leather armor. Some common katagami motifs record this history: the stylized iris pattern that appears on this stencil, and on the textile nearby, symbolizes bravery. The connection arises from the similarity of the words for iris (shobūgawa) and valor or military victory (shobū). Although stencil-dyed fabrics were first associated with samurai, during the course of the Edo period (1603–1868) they became popular among members of the merchant and peasant classes.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18480397/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Elinor Merrell
  • circles
  • birds
  • repetition
  • nature
  • textile design
  • leaves
  • tendrils
  • vegetal
  • curls

Katagami patterns are generally quite meaningful, evoking desirable personal qualities or referring to well-known stories. The crane-and-turtle motif that appears on this textile would have been recognized by Japanese viewers as a reference to a popular folktale the Legend of Urashima Taro. In the story, a fisherman who rescues a turtle is rewarded with long life and transformed into a crane. Here, the intertwined animals are paired with roundels formed of pine branches and bamboo shoots, creating a pattern symbolic of longevity and resilience.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489005/

  • cotton
  • Museum purchase from Friends of Textiles Fund

The delicate floral and geometric pattern that decorates this kimono is so fine as only to be revealed through close examination. Tiny stencil patterns like these, called komon, evoke samurai aesthetics of restraint, and were once worn only by warriors and the nobility. Some families even had exclusive rights to certain patterns. The large stylized floral designs added at the shoulders are feudal family crests.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18478221/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Isao Homma and Mr. and Mrs. S. Okajima in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Tatsugoro Okajima

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489985/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489727/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489749/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18557339/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon juice (kakishibu), silk threads (itoire)
  • Museum purchase through gift of Charles W. Gould

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18400685/

  • cotton
  • Museum purchase from Au Panier Fleuri Fund
  • abstraction
  • repetition
  • textile design
  • leaves
  • vegetal
  • hearts
  • swirls
  • spades

This length of cotton fabric was intended for constructing a light summer kimono called a yukata. It bears a repeated motif of hollyhock leaves and vines, rendered in two shades of rich indigo blue on a white ground. As indigo dye is especially well suited for use with absorbent cotton, traditional yukata feature a color palette of blue and white. Originally worn as an undergarment, the robes were later adopted as popular dress for the bathhouse. By the 19th century, they had moved from the bathhouse to the street, as it became accepted practice for yukata to be worn in public, especially at summer festivals.

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489667/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490209/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489659/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490215/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490117/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489989/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490017/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489977/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk gauze (shabari)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489975/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18463597/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), silk threads (itoire)

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490021/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490031/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490053/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18490065/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), thread links (itotsuri)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489705/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu), and silk threads (itoire)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18489953/

  • mulberry paper (kozo washi) treated with fermented persimmon tannin (kakishibu)
  • Gift of Helen Snyder

Katagami

https://www-6.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/51589537/

  • silk
  • Gift of Masao Aida, Isao Uchida, Airo Aida, and Yuki Ikuta

PEACOCK PATTERN (group label) The craft of using stencils to dye fabric is still practiced by highly skilled Japanese artisans trained in ancient techniques. Isao Uchida, inspired by a stencil in Cooper Hewitt’s collection (seen here), carved a new stencil based on the historic design. Then, master dyer Masao Aida printed the fabric to create a new kimono as a gift for Cooper Hewitt. He selected its cool periwinkle color specifically with the museum in mind. The artisans and their assistants performed a demonstration of the dyeing process at Cooper Hewitt, captured in the video on view nearby. The orange textile in this case was made during their visit.